Press Review 06 March 2017

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Tags: africa; xenophobia european union forced migration;refugees; asylum seekers;development;xenophobia united states

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NATIONAL

The face of the foreigner

eNCA, 3 March 2017

A picture often tells a story, all by itself. But one man says it’s time for a different tale. James Oatway is a photojournalist, who’s covered several xenophobic attacks. While he’s covered several xenophobic attacks over the past decade, one incident stands out. Oatway captured the murder of Mozambican Emmanuel Sithole nearly 2 years ago. Now, he’s changing focus – producing a series of portraits.  “Migrants are always seen in desperate situations,” says Oatway. “I thought, let’s photograph people under normal circumstances, in a positive light.”

Xenophobia is both immoral and irrational – Mmusi Maimane

PoliticsWeb, 28 February 2017

Cape Town – The DA Leader says Department of State Security’s claim that they had no idea about the fomenting of violence shows incompetence.

Gauteng Xenophobia: Gigaba and Mashaba trade accusations

The Daily Maverick, 28 February 2017

Afrophobic attacks in Gauteng appear to have continued since Friday’s anti-migrant march in Tshwane. Meanwhile, Johannesburg Mayor Herman Mashaba, whose comments linking undocumented foreigners to crime preceded the attacks, is accused of avoiding and deflecting responsibility onto Home Affairs Minister Malusi Gigaba.  Am I an African? On xenophobia and violence in South Africa 2017.

Am I an African? On xenophobia and violence in South Africa 2017

eNCA, 24 February 2017

It has been a decade since the ugly, toxic waves of violent attacks across South Africa against people thought to be from elsewhere in Africa: 2008. It has been two years since a spectacular and similarly ugly wave repeated itself: 2015. In-between we marked twenty years of post-apartheid democracy, in the same year that Rwanda marked twenty years since the genocide which ripped its people apart. It is 2017. We are travelling further in time from those early days of hope, of aspiring to better than we were before. The violence and violations of colonialism and apartheid were seemingly fresher, then. But memory is unreliable. We forget, or misremember, the past, and our own lives in that past. The eternal present, the forgetting of history, has painful consequences.

Foreign nationals not involved in crime – Jacob Zuma

Politicsweb.co.za 26, February, 2017

President Jacob Zuma is to champion the fight against crime in order to promote safer and more stable communities, in light of several complaints from communities about drug trafficking and abuse and other serious crimes which cause fear among many residents in the country. President Jacob Zuma is to champion the fight against crime in order to promote safer and more stable communities, in light of several complaints from communities about drug trafficking and abuse and other serious crimes which cause fear among many residents in the country. The situation has become more serious in light of current threats of violence and acts of intimidation and destruction of property directed at non-nationals living in South Africa. Residents in some communities blame non-nationals for the escalating crimes especially drug trafficking. Violence erupted in Pretoria West and Rosettenville, and there are simmering tensions that have been reported in other areas including the dissemination of hate speech and threatening messages via social media.

Op-Ed: Xenophobic attacks mask deep fault lines within South African society

Daily Maverick, 23 February, 2017

Violence has again flared up between ethnic communities in our political capital, Tshwane. These so-called xenophobic attacks are reminiscent of the 2008-2009 national shame where hundreds of foreign nationals had to be housed in tented refugee camps to separate them from violent mobs in our townships. The temptation is to call this phenomena “xenophobia” and lay the blame simplistically at the feet of the perpetrators of the violence. These vigilante mobs are of course responsible for their actions, but as with most social phenomena we risk over-simplifying the matter by seeing it in these terms.

REGIONAL

Nigerian community in South Africa welcomes Senate’s visit over xenophobic attacks

Naij.com, Oluwatobi Bolashodun, 14 February 2017
The Nigerian community in South Africa says the plan by the Senate to send a delegation to the country over the xenophobic attacks is a welcome development.Mr Ikechukwu Anyene, the President of the Nigeria Union, South Africa, told the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) on telephone from Pretoria on Wednesday that the visit would add value to the campaign against xenophobia. “We are pleased to know that a Senate delegation to be led by Sen. Ike Ekeweremadu, Deputy Senate President, will visit South Africa.This visit will add value to all the struggles and campaign against xenophobia in South Africa.”

A deadly journey for children: The migration route from North Africa to Europe

Unicef.org, 24 February, 2017

Refugee and migrant children and women are routinely suffering sexual violence, exploitation, abuse and detention along the Central Mediterranean migration route from North Africa to Italy, UNICEF warned in a new report.  ‘A Deadly Journey for Children: The Central Mediterranean Migrant Route’ provides an in-depth look at the extreme risks facing refugee and migrant children as they make the perilous journey from sub-Saharan Africa into Libya and across the sea to Italy. Three quarters of the refugee and migrant children interviewed as part of a survey said they had experienced violence, harassment or aggression at the hands of adults at some point over the course of their journey, while nearly half of the women and children interviewed reported sexual abuse during migration – often multiple times and in multiple locations.

Africa still lags behind in using innovation to connect refugees

QuartzAfrica.com, 28 February 2017

When refugees and immigrants arrive on the shores of Europe, there’s a website that instructs them on where and how to claim asylum. There’s Gee Cycle, which helps them access smartphones donated by people who have upgraded their devices. The Refugee Info Bus gives them access to Wi-Fi, and Refugees on Rails trains them as software developers to improve their chances on the labor market. There’s also Refugees Welcome, an “Airbnb for refugees,” which connects them to families with spare rooms or houses. These are a slew of the innovations that have greeted refugees who have been trickling into Europe over the last few years. But across sub-Saharan Africa, where close to 30% of the world’s refugees live—compared to just 6% in Europe—technology is yet to surface as a problem-solving tool.

No work means Ethiopia is no home for refugees – report

BusinessInsider.com, 3 March  2017

A ban on Eritrean refugees working in Ethiopia is hampering efforts to reduce illegal “secondary” migration, with tens of thousands risking violence and drowning in pursuit of a better life, the Overseas Development Institute said on Thursday. “Ethiopia is a vital country of asylum, offering the prospect of freedom and security,” said the British think tank, but it added: “Refugees are not allowed to work in Ethiopia, making it hard to build a future in the country.” Hence, it said, most Eritrean refugees living in Ethiopian camps wanted to escape to a third country in the hope of winning work, security and a settled life. A ban on Eritrean refugees working in Ethiopia is hampering efforts to reduce illegal “secondary” migration, with tens of thousands risking violence and drowning in pursuit of a better life, the Overseas Development Institute said on Thursday.

INTERNATIONAL

Worried about Trump, asylum seekers walk cold road to Canada

CNBC.com, 26 February, 2017

Refugees in the United States fearing a worsening climate of xenophobia in the wake of a divisive U.S. presidential campaign are flocking to Canada in growing numbers.Manitoba’s Welcome Place refugee agency helped 91 claimants between Nov. 1 and Jan. 25 – more than the agency normally sees in a year. Most braved the freezing prairie winter to walk into Canada.“We haven’t had something before like this,” said Maggie Yeboah, president of the Ghanaian Union of Manitoba, which has helped refugees get medical attention and housing. “We don’t know what to do.”

Tel Aviv Suburb Ordered to Restore Utilities to Homes of African Asylum Seekers

Haaretz.com, 1, March, 2017

An Israeli court ordered Petah Tikva on Wednesday to restore electricity and water to 12 subdivided apartments, most of which are occupied by asylum seekers from Africa. Utilities in the residences were disconnected on Tuesday. In its ruling, the Lod District Court specified that only a real and present danger could prevent the reconnection. It also ordered the city to cease further disconnections until after an additional hearing on the petition filed by the Association for Civil Rights in Israel is held, later in March. Lawyers for Petah Tikva noted at Wednesday’s hearing that over the next two weeks, utilities were to be discontinued to around 20 additional subdivided apartments.

 

Tags: africa; xenophobia    european union    forced migration;refugees; asylum seekers;development;xenophobia    united states   

Categorised in: Press Review